Tag Archives: #wrtf15

Teachers Pay Teachers

Hello, all! I would love to introduce an awesome resource for school teachers called www.teacherpayteachers.com. I was first introduced to this website in an education course as a college sophomore a few years ago. Let me just say–it’s INCREDIBLE! Teachers Pay Teachers has been around since 2006 and has been saving the lives of teachers everyday. The idea is straight forward: teachers upload work that other teachers can buy. When it comes to their craft, teachers trust each other most. Do you need to create a 1st grade unit on ocean animals but lack creativity or just simply have no idea where to start? You are in luck! The average cost for an item on Teachers Pay Teachers is just $3.50, with entire unit plans usually costing less than $10. Ten dollars?! Yes!

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The website is interactive and you are able to contact every teacher/user who shares materials. You can easily find what you are looking for because everything is broken down into grade category, then further broken down by subject matter. Looking for a 3rd grade Common Core reading activity about helping verbs? You are guaranteed to find something that will meet your needs for a small price. My favorite part about Teachers Pay Teachers? So many items are available for free! All you have to do is create an account and get downloading. On Teachers Pay Teachers, a guide that explains how to accommodate a classroom for kids with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder goes for $2.50. A packet on how to teach parents about guided reading sells for $3.50. Not surprisingly, Common Core workbooks and ready-to-use lesson plans are consistently strong sellers.

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One last note worth mentioning: Aside from buying pre-made materials, teachers can make requests for other teachers to create specific work for them! All you do is give a description of what you want made, set your price, and sit back and wait for all of the offers to roll in! Take a look below.Screen Shot 2015-12-08 at 7.14.03 PM.png

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Child Hunger

The video I chose to look into further is a student made PSA about child hunger in Africa. The creator of the video chose to use emtional images of small starving children, facts and statstics of child hunger in Africa, and stories about specific children and families. Becaus the creator focuses in on certain people, it feels like case studies are being done. The video makes the viewer feel somewhat attached to the stories and the children hunger affects. Although this remix video touches on logos and ethos, it reaches the emotional side the most. Instead of narrative leading this video, the creator decided to use music with appropriate lyrics (Michael Jackson’s “We Are The World”.)

#HashtaggingAllDayEveryday

Hashtags are a thing every living human under the age of about…..30 (?) is highly familiar with. Frustration sets in when trying to explain the purpose of #hashtag to the older generation. My parents who are 55+, for example, are clueless when it comes to hashtagging.

“Why is “#TGIT” on the screen while I’m trying to watch tv? What is #PopeInPhilly supposed to mean? Why can’t they just have a normal title without the pound sign? #YOLO????” -Dad

(Sidenote for my own amusement: There was a bar in Philly that served home brewed “YOPO” beer. You Only Pope Once.)

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It is time to face 2015. Hashtags have become a part of our lives. Being online (Especially social media!) for just five minutes, you are guaranteed to see one of these tags at least twice: #WCW, #TBT, #MCM, #WBW, #selfie. What does all of the nonsense mean??? Simply put, hashtags are a way to quickly click the tag to view other user’s pictures and tweets that are similar to yours. If I were to post a picture with the hashtag, “#OceanCity,” I am sure to see posts from others that focus on Ocean City!

Lindsey Weeston explains in her article, “12 Hashtags That Changed The World In 2014,” that hashtags were used to raise social awareness of trending topics and issues in the news. Weston focused on “#BlackLivesMatter”…a hashtag that took over the scene on Twitter. She explains that hashtags can be so powerful because they bring people together while spreading the word.

A hashtag that has been taking over the Twitterverse these days is “IStandWithPP.” This hashtag promotes supporting Planned Parenthood through all of the negative attention the media is showing them. #IStandWithPP tweeters show support for women’s health issues.

Hashtags can be fun, important, useless, or groundbreaking. While there is no doubt that hashtags can mean nothing, they can be a positive force to promote good! #HaveANiceDay! #ThanksForReading!

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Let’s Talk!

Barton and Hamilton discuss literacy and social practices in depth in their article titled, “Literacy Practices.” The authors explain how mout forms of literacy have always had some type of social connection attached. Weather it be literacy connected to verbal communication, or simply reading for pleasure, there is usually a human connection that occurs. The social response tied to literacy can have drastic differences depending on the discourse communities it reaches. For example: a community living in poverty would have a very different reaction to a news story about…oh I don’t know…free Thanksgiving dinners, than a community living in Beverly Hills would.

Dicpscourse communities are a topic I have studied extensively here at Rowan University, and can be broken down into a definition as simply as, “A community of people who share a common interest and use similar language to communicate…which usually only makes sense among the community.”

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To give a further example of discourse communities: I have studied ballet my entire life, and sometimes write for dance blogs, magazines, or forums. There is very highly specialized vocabulary in the ballet world that only dancers would ever understand. If I used the same vocabulary in my everyday life that I use when speaking amongst fellow dancers, people would look at me like I was insane! All ballet dancers have a deep understanding of other dancer’s lives and can therefore speak freely without worrying about not being understood by outsiders.

This article by Barton and Hamilton was fairly eye opening, but I feel like most people already knew social aspect was tied to literacy. Maybe I’m wrong!